How to Use Blade Baits Effectively

Bladebaits are extremely versatile. It really is hard to work them improperly. With their wiggling action provided with vibrations sent out through the water and an enticing eratic fall, these lures can really bring in fish. Fish can detect these vibrations from a distance and seek them out. Follow these tips to help you use blade baits effectively.

The most common presentation for these baits is vertical jigging, and it’s also where they really shine. Fine tuning this presentation depends on preference and the fishes’ mood. They can be jigged hard enough to set the hook and moved at a distance of two to four feet in the water column, to more subtle approaches of mere inches at a time. Some allow the bait to free fall, while others keep the line semi tight on the drop to be able to detect strikes better. Both approaches work and are a matter of preference. In most cases, the fish will strike as the bait falls. Sometimes a shake of the wrist can trigger a strike after the bait falls. In extremely cold water and during slow bites, a dead stick approach might even earn a few strikes. Suspend the bait and let the wind and water currents give it action. This doesn’t always work but may be the ticket when nothing else produces. When jigging make sure your drag is set properly. When setting a hook directly overhead, alot of tension is applied to the line and it is easy to lose fish if the drag is set too tight. Sometimes the hooks will pull free or worse, the line will break.

These baits can also be casted and retrieved like a crank bait. For variation, they can also be casted out and retrieved with a jigging motion, allowing it to fall after each lift of the fishing rod. Adjust your retrieve speed accordingly to the fishes’ mood.

Always find the correct depth and work these baits where the fish are in the water column. For saugeyes, this will almost always be near bottom. Some prefer to keep the bait one to two feet off of bottom, while others will allow the bait to pound the bottom on the drop, which stirs up silt and can attract fish. Also, it is recommended that you use snaps instead of tying directly to the bait. Keep the line tag short to prevent the hooks from tangling, and make sure you can feel the bait through the fishing rod. If you can’t feel it the hooks are probably tangled in the line and need untangled.

Try these baits out sometime. They are an excellent addition to any tackle box. At times they can be the best choice for a successful fishing trip. Also, when it comes to a fish inhaling the bait directly from below, they are just plain fun!

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